About composerinthegarden

A composer by vocation, a gardener by avocation. My garden and my life as a composer are deeply intertwined - the yin and yang of my creative life. . .

You’re a good boy, Charlie Brown

A week ago, we were delighted to have our poodle “nephew”, Charlie Brown, visit us for a few days. Charlie and Angel celebrated his 14th birthday with party hats and extra treats on the “cookie rug” poodlebirthdayparty

followed by a good nap. CharlieNap

As he aged, Charlie lost most of his eyesight and hearing, so it took him a day to get his bearings. He took to following his beloved Angel around the garden.CharlieFollowsAngelThey’ve been best friends since they were pups and play non-stop on their visits with each other. dogplaywp

Last year, they celebrated a snowstorm with their antics – what fun! (click on any photo in the mosaic to see a larger image)

A few days after his delightful visit last week, Charlie Brown passed away in his sleep, in his own home with his human Mom and sister Madison nearby. A sweet funny boy who was smart, gentle, and unfailingly loving, he will be deeply missed. We count ourselves lucky that we had a few last precious days with him. You are such a good boy, sweet Charlie Brown. Safe journey.charliebrownwp

Dogs are our link to paradise. They don’t know evil or jealousy or discontent. To sit with a dog on a hillside on a glorious afternoon is to be back in Eden, where doing nothing was not boring — it was peace. ~Milan Kundera

All text and photos ©2019 Lynn Emberg Purse except where noted.

 

The golden hour

In photography, the golden hour is the period of daytime shortly after sunrise or before sunset, during which daylight is redder and softer than when the Sun is higher in the sky. ~Wikipedia

We had three glorious days of sunshine this past week, probably a first for this year. The garden reveled in the sunshine and bloomed gloriously at the height of daylily season. pinkhems2

The soul becomes dyed with the color of its thoughts. ~Marcus Aurelius

Pink daylilies bloomed with abandon

as did the purple and plum colored ones.

Flowers with eyes seemed to follow me with their gaze wherever I went in the garden

while the deepest colors added bass tones to the floral orchestra.

Without black, no color has any depth. But if you mix black with everything, suddenly there’s shadow – no, not just shadow, but fullness. You’ve got to be willing to mix black into your palette if you want to create something that’s real. ~Amy Grant

According to local weather tracking, only 29% of the days this year have been without rain or other precipitation. Like any gardener, I treasure rain but it has been a dark and gloomy summer. After those few glorious days of sunshine, the rain returned with a series of furious storms that pounded the garden with wind, water and spates of lightening and thunder for most of the day. Dozens of roads were flooded in the area; after a summer of heavy rain, the soil simply could not absorb any more.

The rain began again. It fell heavily, easily, with no meaning or intention but the fulfilment of its own nature, which was to fall and fall. ~Helen Garner

dewyroseleaf

In late afternoon, the rain stopped and the sky lightened. By early evening, sunlight unexpectedly sifted through the trees and turned the garden into a golden land.

treelight

While many of the flowers were battered and sodden, their color sang to me from below as I stood at the top of the hill.  The battle with weeds and soggy garden beds were forgotten. The world was glowing.

I stood transfixed as the garden seemed to turn to me and say “See? We are fine. Stop worrying about neatness or perfection and join us as we revel in this golden hour.” rosedereschtrain

Once in a golden hour,
I cast to earth a seed,
And up there grew a flower,
That others called a weed. ~Tennyson

All text and photos ©2019 Lynn Emberg Purse, All Rights Reserved except where noted.

Clay

This morning, the Independence Day holiday in the United States, was quiet, serene, and full of life. As I walked through the garden soon after dawn, there was no noise from traffic, no conversations trailing from the homes of neighbors. Angel and I moved through the flowers, listening to bird song and witnessing the flight of butterflies and bees. Such an oasis of quiet in an otherwise noisy holiday punctuated by fireworks and noisemakers. I noted the rich beautiful blossoms of daylily (Hemerocallis) ‘American Revolution’ – striking in its dark color and defined form still dotted with  morning dew.

AmericanRevolution

Daylily ‘Tiger Eye Spider’ looked like a silent explosion of color, a floral fireworks fitting to the day.

tigereyespider

In a few weeks, we will submit the final mixes of my CD Watershed for duplication, with a scheduled fall release. While listening to Bill editing the music today, it felt right to share a preview of the third movement of one of the pieces on the CD, Sketches of America. In a time of tumult in our country, I am reminded of the main theme of this piece, the melody of “America the Beautiful” and how I love the beauty of this country and its highest ideals.

Sketches of America was inspired by my travels through the American landscape as well as an exploration of uniquely American musical forms, specifically minimalism and the blues. The orchestral piece has three main sections and features solo trumpet and trombone in various ways.  The final section is a chorale adapted from a solo song that I wrote entitled Clay. Struggling to create a new garden on solid clay soil, I responded by writing an ode to clay, exploring its dual nature and potential symbolism for life.

Clay, so full of life to be released
through fork and spade and shredded leaf,
the solid ground beneath our feet,
Clay.

Trumpeter Sean Jones and trombonist Ed Kocher soar in a beautiful and poignant manner in this section. The hymn like song Clay seemed a fitting end for “Sketches of America,” the solid ground beneath our feet and a reminder of the melody of America the Beautiful. I dedicated this piece to my father, whose birthday was on the 4th of July. Enjoy.

Special thanks to Bill Purse, sound engineer and producer extraordinaire, and Jim Cunningham of WQED-FM for sharing the live concert recording of Sketches of America as broadcast on WQED-FM.

All music, text, and images ©2019 Lynn Emberg Purse, All Rights Reserved

The Inner Garden: Father’s Day Edition

Baby Lynn at pianoYears ago, in the 1990’s, I created my first video entitled The Inner Garden. In those days, it took over 20 hours to render a small low resolution video in Adobe Premiere. Nevertheless, I wrote, filmed and edited a series of short stories about making a garden into a 20 minute film, including reminiscences about childhood garden experiences. This week, I thought of one of the scenes – Planting Onions: Sage Advice – when considering Father’s Day. My father passed away several years ago and my best memories of him are about sharing music and gardening. He was my first music teacher, teaching me the mysteries of notes on the piano and leading family music sessions of everything from brass choirs for church to jazzy jam sessions.

Even though the resolution is low, I hope you enjoy this little video of family garden memories from my younger self  🙂  Happy Father’s Day to all fathers everywhere – be sure to take time to share yourself with your children – it will build a lifetime of  memories.

All music, text, and media ©2019 Lynn Emberg Purse, All Rights Reserved

 

Lavish Summer

No price is set on the lavish summer;
June may be had by the poorest comer. ~James Russell Lowell

After near constant rain for weeks, the sun has returned and the garden is lavish and lush.

peonyallium

Peonies blossomed between the rain storms, although the pounding rains shortened their bloom lifespan. (click on any photo to see a full size image)

We have returned to a more normal weather pattern and the roses and cottage garden flowers of early June have emerged.

Rosa ‘Complicata’ covered the arbor with her large simple blooms, draping boughs into the yellow leafed Spirea below while fallen petals drift across the path.

It was June, and the world smelled of roses. The sunshine was like powdered gold over the grassy hillside. ~Maud Hart Lovelace

English rose ‘Abraham Darby’ went from tight bud to open bloom over three days, releasing its lush fragrance at last.

More roses bloomed among the perennials

while a few clematis twine through the arms of roses and shrubs.

The steps in the garden are a froth of gold with the blooms of sedum and Corydalis lutea. GoldenSteps

A few days ago, the berries of the mulberry tree on the edge of the garden ripened. mulberrytree

The tree is full of birds and squirrels feasting on the bounty and the lazy afternoons have been spent watching their antics.

Each day, new flowers open and the garden is in constant flux, yet always beautiful. What a delight, this lavish summer.rosearch

And since all this loveliness can not be Heaven, I know in my heart it is June. ~Abba Woolson

All text and photos ©2019 Lynn Emberg Purse, All Rights Reserved, except where noted.