What the Storm Brought

  • mounds of snow
  • playtime with Angel Eyes
  • breathtaking winter scenes
  • warmer weather and a thaw
  • the last snow storm of the year?

I woke up to a winter wonderland in March, every twig and bough coated with snow. By this afternoon, most of the six inches of snow was melting away. Ephemeral beauty; a black and white world in color.

In Like a Lion

In like a lion, out like a lamb.  (weather lore for March)

It is my great hope that the saying runs true this year, as more snowy icy weather has arrived with March here in western Pennsylvania. The woods and garden were undeniably lovely this morning as Angel and I rambled about. I spoke on “Fun With Color” to a master gardener’s graduation dinner last night; my inner vision was still filled with all of the color saturated garden photos in my presentation and I dreamed of the garden in full bloom last night. How startling to carry that colorful inner vision into the morning world of white and gray and brown! Nevertheless, the grainy snowfall fell gracefully against tree and stone and I could not but help admire nature’s monochromatic beauty.

Click on any image to start the gallery view.

All images ©2013 Lynn Emberg Purse, All Rights Reserved

To see some of those color-saturated garden photos, explore the Flower Portrait and Garden Photo galleries in the Photo Gallery Section.

For another March lion celebration, check out Carol’s Friday dance post featuring Miriam Makeba.

Snowed Under

“Snowed under” – overworked; exceptionally busy (The Free Dictionary)

snowy tree trunkIt has been snowing a lot lately, and I have been feeling “snowed under” both literally and figuratively.  Winter is beautiful and I love my work, but sometimes it is just too much of a good thing. I hope to resume regular posts this weekend. Until then, enjoy a few snow photos.

Snowy woods

Snowy woods

Snowy steps into the garden

Snowy steps into the garden

(all text and photographs © Lynn Emberg Purse, 2013)

A Song for the Winter Solstice

Winter, an artist’s sketch in charcoal, so clearly etched against a cloud filled sky. . .

Snowy WoodsIn celebration of the moment when the earth turns on its axis back to the light of the sun.  This year, in the northern hemisphere, the winter solstice occurs on December 22. Time and Date offers a clear explanation of the solstice as well as explores the customs and traditions around it. To see a beautiful collection of “brown and gray and sometimes white” nature photography, explore Robin’s post on frosted Queen Ann’s Lace in Life in the Bogs.

“Winter” was one of those songs written in a moment, in a winter where snow alternated with grey skies and brown earth. This recording is a “first take” for both the piano and vocal. The visuals are all from my garden.  Enjoy!

All music making is collaborative in nature.  A special thanks to Barbara Nissman for contributing her master’s touch on the piano to this song and Mike Tomaro for his haunting soprano sax improvisations. And as always, to my gifted husband Bill Purse, who generously shares his skills as audio engineer and producer in my artistic endeavors.

Winter, ©2009 Lynn Emberg Purse All RIghts Reserved

Winter, snow falling down
Winter, the world is gray and brown, gray and brown and sometimes white
for a night and a day, then all is gray

Autumn in leaves of gold
Springtime, a thousand shades of green unfold to summer
with its joyous Joseph’s Coat of colors, endless colors, endless colors . . .

Winter, an artist’s sketch in charcoal
so clearly etched against a cloud filled sky
Subtle and dark, lovely and stark in gentle tones of gray
and brown and sometimes white
for a night and a day, then all turns gray
Winter today

Soft clouds, soft snow, soft browns, whites and grays
Winter today

Text and media of “A Song for the Winter Solstice” ©2011 Lynn Emberg Purse, All Rights Reserved. Please do not reblog.

Turbulent Transitions

I stood on a hill in Dunoon, Scotland, in the middle of March many years ago. Powerful winds brought a succession of rain, sleet, snow, hail, and sunshine over and over again in the course of an hour – a microcosm of the turbulent transition from one season to another. The change of seasons this week in Western Pennsylvania was less compressed – spread over days rather than minutes – but otherwise not so different. The week began with a warm evening on the deck, listening to what surely would be the final cicada and frog chorus of the season.  Gusty winds brought cold temperatures and days of rain, followed by an enchantingly beautiful misty morning immediately followed by a snowy morning, all in less than a week.

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Though I’m reluctant to acknowledge the end of the gardening season and the coming of winter, I must admit that I love the turbulent changes that the seasons’ transitions bring. There is a certain security in knowing that one season will follow another, an overarching stability of structure. But the passage from one state to another is filled with chaos, unpredictability and extreme fluctuations. It is this push pull of change and stability that fascinates me, and it seems to be at the heart of my artistic endeavors as well. Achieving a balance between the familiar and the novel, the security of what has been done and the adventure of exploring new ideas, is an ongoing dynamic in my work, and perhaps in my life as well. 

A video celebration of nature’s transitions in my garden, set to the music of “Falling” from “Three States of Being.”

Here’s another take on the idea of transitions as passages, courtesy of Margie Strosser.

All text and images of “Turbulent Transitions” ©2011 Lynn Emberg Purse, All Rights Reserved